UNINTENDED EARLY FLOWERING

Soft-Secrets’-Plant-of-the-Year-2019

I’m growing outdoors and some of the clones seem a bit retarded as the buds have formed on the stalk. I had heard you said to go ahead and remove them to hopefully re-grow til the end of the season.
I’m growing outdoors and some of the clones seem a bit retarded as the buds have formed on the stalk. I had heard you said to go ahead and remove them to hopefully re-grow til the end of the season. My question is how to remove them, there is no stem to snip off at the base of the bud, they are coming straight out of the stalk. I’ve not seen this before. They are pretty small but very sticky. What should I do?
Julie
There are three reasons why plants may start to flower early. The first is that the plants were placed outdoors while there was still a dark period long enough to force flowering. The second cause might be that there was a dramatic change in the lighting environment. The third is that the plants are receiving a critical amount of darkness that is enough to force the variety to flower.
When plants are placed outdoors early in the season, March or April, there is still a long enough dark period to force flowering. On March 22, the first day of spring, the plants receive a little less than 12 hours of darkness. This forces them into flowering. As the days get longer most varieties, excluding some indicas, go back to vegetative cycle and then flower normally in the fall. Some indicas continue to flower and never re-vegetate.

When some varieties of seedlings or clones are grown under continuous light or a long light cycle such as 20 hours daily and then placed outdoors where they receive only 14-15 hours of light, the change of light cycle is enough to trigger a flowering response even if the variety usually doesn’t flower under a 9 or 10 hour dark period. Plants with this problem usually readjust to vegetative growth after a few weeks.
Varieties differ in the number of hours of darkness needed to initiate flowering. Early maturing varieties often require as few as 8 or 9 hours of uninterrupted darkness daily to force flowering. In lower latitude areas such as southern California and other areas in the lower tier of the U.S., and Mediterranean Europe including Spain and Italy, indica and indica-sativa hybrids flower very early, resulting in small plants, because the dark period is too long, even in mid-summer, to keep the plants in vegetative growth. Instead they are forced into flowering.
The solution for this problem is the same no matter what the cause; the dark period must be interrupted. When the dark period is interrupted by light for even a few moments, the darkness countdown is restarted from zero. Use a warm-white fluorescent or high-pressure sodium (HPS) light. Imagine that the light is like a water spray that must reach all parts of the plant. The light only has to contact it for a brief moment.
If the plants flowered because they were placed out too early in the season, you can stop using a light-break in mid-May. If the plants are coming from a continuous light environment they will need the light for about a month before they adjust to the new environment. Indicas growing in low latitudes require the light-break until they are ready to be forced to flower.

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